Pictures from yesterday’s Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol

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U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., talks with Doris Crenshaw before the Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony at the U.S. Capitol honoring the four girls killed in the 1963 bombing on 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. Sept. 10, 2013

U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., talks with Doris Crenshaw before the Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony at the U.S. Capitol honoring the four girls killed in the 1963 bombing on 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. Sept. 10, 2013 (Photo by Mary Orndorff Troyan)

WASHINGTON — In addition to the families of the four girls killed in the 1963 Birmingham church bombing, there were hundreds of other special guests at yesterday’s Congressional Gold Medal ceremony.

Montgomery civil rights activist Doris Crenshaw was sitting waiting for the event to begin when a living legend of the movement, U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, sat down next to her.

Crenshaw, the founder and CEO of the Southern Youth Leadership Development Institute, was not lamenting that it took 50 years for the girls to get such national recognition.

 ”When it happens, it’s always on time,” Crenshaw said. “ Things never happen in our time. It’s in God’s time. This at this time for a reason. This shines the spotlight on violence and what it does to people and I think we can use this as a teachable moment.”

Families of the four girls killed in the 1963 church bombing gather on the steps of the U.S. Capitol before the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony. Sept. 10, 2013 (Photo courtesty of Rep. Spencer Bachus' office.)

Families of the four girls killed in the 1963 church bombing gather on the steps of the U.S. Capitol before the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony. Sept. 10, 2013 (Photo courtesy of Rep. Spencer Bachus’ office.)

Crenshaw arrived with Dorothy Wright-Tillman of Montgomery, the former member of the Chicago City Council who also marched with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Other Montgomery figures in the room were Richard Cohen, president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and Rep. Martha Roby, R-Montgomery.

2 thoughts on “Pictures from yesterday’s Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol

  1. Unfortunately, Cynthia’s real identity, MORRIS, was not clarified as promised. Instead, the official program read “Wesley” which is INCORRECT and Cynthia was referred to as Cynthia D. Wesley Morris.

    On Sept. 14th, a new sculpture depicting the slain daughters will be unveiled at the edge of Kelly Ingram Park. The name inscribed in that piece is Cynthia D. Morris Wesley.

    It is unfathomable that elected leaders who are in possession of official documents acknowledged by the State of Alabama that clearly state: ” the facts are, Cynthia Dionne Wesley is actually Cynthia Diane Morris.”

    Why perpetuate a lie?

    Gertrude Wesley finally admitted that Cynthia was not adopted; she was not their child – her name was Morris during a Channel 13 NBC News interview.

    The ruse continues by those that compose the political firewall in Birmingham. The lies sewn by others decades ago prevent the actual victims from seeking full relief and justice. Those who fraudulently claim memories and experiences that belong to the real victims; with the express purpose of generating revenue, bolstering fund-raising, or increasing opportunities that result in personal gain are morally reprehensible.

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